ACARES Monthly Meeting -- September 14th 7:00pm -- CCSD ESC 4700 S. Yosemite St. Greenwood Village, CO

Winter is here are you ready?

The cold and snow will be here before you know it. Are you and your vehicle ready? Click here for some tips from the National Safety Council on preparing your vehicle.

Shoveling snow is part of living in Colorado so take the precautions found here

Frostbite

Frostbite should be treated immediately! Common sense clothing tips are:

  • Bundle up in several layers of loose clothing
  • Wear mittens rather than gloves
  • Cover your ears with a warm hat
  • Wear socks that will keep your feet warm and dry
  • Superficial frostbite affects the skin surface, while the underlying tissue remains soft. The skin appears white, waxy or grayish-yellow and is cold and numb.

If you suspect frostbite:

  • Get indoors immediately
  • Seek medical attention
  • Remove constrictive clothing and jewelry that could impair circulation
  • Place dry, sterile gauze between toes and fingers to absorb moisture and keep them from sticking together
  • Elevate the affected area to reduce pain and swelling
  • For superficial frostbite, you may also place the affected area in water that is 100 to 105 degrees until the tissue softens
  • Hypothermia

Hypothermia

Hypothermia occurs when the body's temperature drops below 95 degrees. Severe shivering, one of the first signs of hypothermia, is beneficial in keeping the body warm. But as hypothermia progresses, shivering gives way to drowsiness or exhaustion, confusion, shallow breathing, irregular heartbeat, slurred speech, loss of coordination and, eventually, unconsciousness and even death.

In one of the most bizarre symptoms of hypothermia, "paradoxical undressing," a person actually undresses instead of bundling up. Researchers believe that in the final throes of hypothermia, a person may feel like he or she is overheating due to a rush of warm blood to the extremities.

So what should you do if you encounter someone suffering from hypothermia?

  • Move the victim inside and remove any wet clothing
  • Call for medical attention
  • Add blankets, pillows, towels or newspapers beneath and around the victim
  • Cover the victim's head
  • Handle the victim gently to avoid cardiac arrest
  • Keep the victim in a horizontal position
  • If necessary, give CPR
  • None of these steps are a substitute for proper medical care. Be sure to seek medical attention for frostbite and hypothermia as soon as possible.

Find these and many more tips at the National Safety Council Website: http://www.nsc.org/

 

A Winter Ready Home

Snowy HomeYou might wear gloves and a hat to protect yourself from cold temperatures outside, but did you know that your home needs protection, too?

With the proper maintenance, you can prepare your home for the winter season and reduce heat loss during a power outage.

 

 

Follow these tips from America’s PrepareAthon! (How to Prepare for a Winter Storm), including:

  • Hire a contractor to check the structural ability of your roof to sustain unusually heavy weight from the accumulation of snow or ice;
  • Insulate pipes with insulation or newspaper and plastic;
  • Allow faucets to drip during cold weather to avoid freezing; and
  • Have a professional inspect your chimney or heating equipment.

For added warmth, you may choose to use indoor space heaters. If you purchase a space heater, look for one that has an automatic shut-off or tip-over switch. Place the heater on a level surface away from high-traffic areas and flammable items such as curtains, bedding, or furniture. Make sure the room has enough ventilation to help prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

Winter Care for Pets

Winter weather can be dangerous not only for humans, but for pets too! Taking extra precautions throughout the season can ensure your pets stay healthy and happy. The Humane Society of the Unites States offers tips to keep pets safe, including:

  • Protect paws from salt. This and other chemicals used to melt snow and ice can irritate the pads of your pet’s feet. Be sure to wipe off their paws with a damp towel;
  • Keep pets warm and indoors. No matter the temperature, windchill can threaten a pet’s life. Pets are sensitive to severe cold and are at risk for frostbite when outdoors during extreme cold snaps; and
  • Avoid antifreeze poisoning. Antifreeze has a sweet taste that may attract animals but is a deadly poison. Don’t allow pets to wander unattended near driveways, garages or other places when they may come into contact with antifreeze.

It only takes a few tablespoons of highly toxic antifreeze to injure your pet. Learn the signs of antifreeze poisoning.