ACARES Monthly Meeting -- November 14th at 7:00pm -- Cherry Creek Schools Educational Services Center

I am now seven months into the Emergency Coordinator position.  A major objective has been to increase our training, both at the meetings as well as off site. Recently, the National Association of Emergency Room Physicians held their yearly conference in Denver.  Ten members of Arapahoe County ARES participated in the  Operation AirSmack exercise on November 9th a culmination of this conference   The event was held in Denver's City Park with the scenario of two small aircraft colliding over the park with injures to plane passengers as well as people in the park.  Simulated injuries were given to volunteers so the physicians could treat them.  The event coordinator was delighted with the ability of ARES to communicate to the five stations around Ferrell lake as well as to communicate with the headquarters.  This exercise ranks as one of the best training events I have attended in many years.  We will continue to look for other opportunities to practice our radio skills as well continuing to work with our ARES neighbors as opportunities arise.

 

Within the next several weeks, we will publish a training schedule for our monthly meetings thru June of next year.  I anticipate the training will include out of class room experiences.    In order to be prepared for emergency communication we must continue to educate ourselves as well as practice our radio skills.

 

I have advised the Denver and Adams County ARES groups that they will be welcomed at our training sessions. This serves to further unite area metro ARES districts and increase our ability to work together as a team.

 

Respectfully,

 

Peter Meer, KCØVAQ

Emergency Coordinator

Arapahoe County Amateur Radio Emergency Service

After 9/11, I wanted to be able to help if  we were attacked again.  In 2005, I connected with Tim Armagost, WBØTUB, SK, the brother of a vendor I use in my property management business.  I have always had an interest in ham radio and pursed it through Tim and ACARES.  I firmly believe that if  “regular” communication (cell phones, etc.) fail our mutual abilities on radio would be of great value.  Since 2005, I have participated in many radio events: Arapahoe County Fair (yearly),  Cherry Creek Schools Fitness day (I coordinated it twice), MS 150 Bike Tour (several times) and a variety of other radio events for the last 14 years.  Two years ago Mark Boddy appointed me as Planning Chief. Last year I took on Training as well.  I greatly enjoy the group and love working radio.  I only work half days (I own my business), which gives me the time to work on ACARES.  I would like to contribute more to the group then the two previous positions provided.

For the future, I would like to see more consistent training doing as much hands on as possible.  In order to provide service to the various groups we support, we must be:  available, well trained and committed to our mission.  We need to seek as much involvement as our members are willing to provide.  A greater emphasis should be placed on showing the public what we can do.  Since there are so many things we could do, I will need some time to figure that one out.

A personal thank you to Mark Boddy, KD5DKQ for his strong recommendation for the appointment.  Additionally a special thank you to Ben Baker, KBØUBZ who has been my ELMER since day one in 2005.  His support in seeking the EC position was a critical part of my decision.

Peter Meer KCØVAQ
Emergency Coordinator
Arapahoe County Amateur Radio Emergency Service

I was browsing some news and read the story below. Here in Colorado that could easily have been a life threatening event.

NORTH PORT, Fla. (AP) — A Florida woman who became lost during a half-marathon trail run was found past nightfall after wandering around a 25,000-acre park for nearly 12 hours.

The Sarasota Times-Herald reports Melissa Kitcher was in good spirits after being found Sunday evening. She says she made a wrong turn more than three miles into the 13.1-mile run.

Race director Thierry Rouillard says he had no idea Kitcher was still on the trail until her husband called late Sunday afternoon, hours after the Trail Hog run finished. Sarasota County Sheriff's Office deputies began searching soon after.

Kitcher says her cell phone froze before the race but she never really worried since she knew her family would come looking for her. She plans to run the Sarasota Half Marathon in March and finish.

Source:  http://www.9news.com/mb/news/nation-now/florida-woman-in-half-marathon-lost-for-12-hours-then-found/364431687

We, ARES members, pride ourselves on our ability to communicate over amateur radio but I will suggest we should spend more time practicing the "what" we are communicating! Because Hams tend to be geeks we are asked to do a lot of things at large events and incidents that do not fall into the "Amateur Radio" category. I think that's okay and welcome the opportunity to help out any way I can. It increases our contribution to solving the incident/event and makes us more valuable to our served agencies. But when it comes to communication and in this instance specifics such as runner bib numbers is it enough to just communicate the bib number and go on? I think not.

I do not know the details of this particular race and mean no ill towards the event staff and only use this as a good example for us to learn from. I carry a small notebook that fits in the leg pocket of my super cool tactical pants (inside humor...) that I get to wear at ARES events just like this. I write everything down in it. At the end of my shift I go someplace quiet that has a desk where I transfer everything over to an ICS-214. For me it beats keeping a folded up copy of a 214 in my pocket that gets trashed during my shift while I walk around, sit, climb, or do anything else asked of me. Other folks have other ways of doing theirs and that's okay. Just as long as it gets done.  It is incredibly important to complete the 214 for every shift and I'm the first one to admit I need to practice more at doing mine!

Using the notebook I can write any and everything down at the moment it happens. REMEMBER: IF IT ISN'T WRITTEN DOWN IT DID NOT HAPPEN! I can't stress that enough. So what gets written down in the 214? In a nutshell it's the 3 A's. Actions, Accidents, and Agreements. What Actions have I taken on my own or have been asked to take at the request of Net Control? What Accidents have I witnessed or been on scene of and what are the details of said accident(s)? Lastly, what I have told someone I would do and when did I do it or what have I agreed to and when did I do it?

Before turning in your ICS 214 use your cell phone to grab a good photo of all pages you've written on so that you have a copy should something come up down the road. Thanks for indulging me by reading some ramblings of mine.

Thank-You also for your continued support and as always, if you have a question please direct it to ec at arapahoeares dot org. 

73 de KCØVAQ